Bali ::: They Paved Paradise

Professional Balinese surfer Mega Semadhi is
deeply worried about the future of his island
paradise.

Broadcast: 15/05/2012
Reporter: Matt Brown


There’s a growing resistance - particularly among young Bali locals - to rampant development on the island and tourism at any cost so they’re mobilising.

They’re angry about the environmental and cultural impact of millions of international visitors, the staggering hotel and commercial development that’s gobbling up their island, and they’re uneasy about a creeping 'Kuta cancer' that’s spreading, they fear, from the Bintang boulevards of the island’s busiest beach all the way to the spiritual heartland of Ubud up in Bali’s high country.

“I remember when I lived 200 metres away from Kuta Beach and at night I could clearly hear the sound of the waves from my room. Now you can hear people say f***off!” JRX, Bali Rock Star

On a deeply personal odyssey back to his favourite surfing getaway, Indonesia Correspondent Matt Brown meets the leaders of a new generation determined to stop the overcommercialisation of Bali and to put a lid on development.

Matt surfs the now sullied waters of Uluwatu with local board-rider Mega whose time on the global pro surfing tour has opened his eyes to concepts like sustainability and environmental responsibility.

“If every place is like Kuta with high-rise buildings everywhere then Bali is not like Bali anymore. If that happens it’s like, our souls are lost.” MEGA, Bali Surf Pro

Over in family friendly Nusa Dua, in the shadow of another massive 5-Star hotel development Matt hears from impassioned activist Gendo.

“(Even) when we know Bali is being destroyed, Balinese people are like lemmings. An animal that, consciously, knows when he gets near the ocean, he’s (going to) kill himself. But they keep on doing it.” GENDO, Environmental Activist

Up in the relative peace and tranquillity of Ubud Princess Arry Nova Dewi Putra fears the encroaching development.
“We don’t want Ubud to turn into Kuta” she cautions.
______________________________________
Further Information


Originally from Australia, long time Bali resident and environmental activist, Michael O'Leary founded the R.O.L.E. Foundation in 2007.
Former ABC researcher Lia Collinson asks Is Bali Doing as Well as it Should Be?
______________________________________
Transcript


BROWN: [preparing surfboard] “Get some waves?”

It is home to some of the best surf in the world. It’s also home to Mega Semadhi who knows better than most – certainly way better than me – how to ride the waves of Uluwatu, Bali.

MEGA SEMADHI: “It’s like dancing to the moon, yeah”.

BROWN: Mega is a home grown champion, one of Bali’s top pro surfers. He’s living the dream.

MEGA SEMADHI: “Surfing has taken me to other countries, like Hawaii and Australia. If I didn’t go surfing… this is difficult…perhaps I’d be a fisherman or a farmer just like my grandfather”.

BROWN: His grandfather, even his father, knew a very different Uluwatu. A sleepy, off the beaten track corner of Bali, before the crowds and the surf tourists came and over time dramatically reshaped the place.

MEGA SEMADHI: “We go surfing to enjoy ourselves but if it’s too crowded it’s difficult. We rush and compete for the waves. And in the end we’re fighting. It’s not fun. It’s unpleasant”.

BROWN: Over the last 40 years, millions of surfers have come here chasing their own slice of paradise but the influx of visitors is not being well managed and now it’s threatening the very things that make Bali beautiful.

In the 1970’s, many of the first generation of surfers took a winding dirt road south from the main centre Denpasar to find this rugged and remote coast. Its reliable breaks and crystal clean water quickly became the stuff of legend. I first came here fresh out of school but returning today it’s obvious Uluwatu’s popularity has come at a cost the locals can no longer ignore.

MIKE O’LEARY: “When we come here in 1979 there was absolutely no pollution at all”.

BROWN: Australian Mike O’Leary is a local well and truly. He found his first pilgrimage to Uluwatu simply enchanting and he decided to make Bali his home.

MIKE O’LEARY: “Bali was known for its gentle spiritualism. Back in those days you could actually feel, well... ghosts or spirits. You could feel that in the air back in the 70’s and the 80’s. I think it’s probably one of the top six best known surf breaks in the world and it’s a must see on every surfer’s tour of the world”.

BROWN: All that attention has had a dramatic impact and Mike O’Leary’s worried it’s just too much for this place to bear.

MIKE O’LEARY: “Between ten and fifteen thousand people a month are hitting here”.

BROWN: Out of sight of the cafes and surf shops that have sprung up over time, ample evidence of a little backwater bursting under the strain.

MIKE O’LEARY: “Yeah just come in here Matt. This is where there’s a bit of a cess pool here that the surfers don’t see. Everyone sees a great environment of Uluwatu out in the surf but they don’t see the accumulation of the cooking oil, sewerage and other liquid waste”.

BROWN: “It stinks doesn’t it?”

MIKE O’LEARY: “Yeah it stinks, it stinks and I think it’s been going for the last thirty years and I think it keeps seeping out”.

BROWN: Mike and a bunch of other surfers have raised money to test the waters and found human effluent is seeping down to the surf. While they’ve already set up a garbage service they’re still struggling to fund a new sewerage system. In many ways Uluwatu is a microcosm of Bali’s mounting problems.

MIKE O’LEARY: “Bali like the rest of the world has become very serious and money orientated”.

BROWN: Alarm bells have been ringing for decades but Bali is now being stretched to breaking point. Since the late 1970’s the population’s grown from around two and a half million, up towards the four million mark and the number of tourists has exploded from a hundred and twenty thousand a year to well over two and a half million – including eight hundred thousand Australians. Together they generate thousands of tons of rubbish each day and the waste problem is quite simply out of control.

As the tourists pour in, the rubbish is piling up and spilling over and it’s turning these environmentally sensitive mangroves into a putrid swamp that stinks to high heaven. This is just a few kilometres away from the Kuta tourist trap but it’s light years away from tropical paradise.

The rubbish floats down the rivers and out into the sea, piling up on the world famous Kuta Beach. Kuta is the epicentre of Bali’s transformation. It’s radical, ceaseless redevelopment has sparked intense debate about what it now means to be Balinese.

MEGA SEMADHI: “If every place becomes like Kuta, with high rise buildings everywhere maybe then Bali will not be like Bali anymore. If that happens I’ll be very concerned. It would be like… we’ve lost our souls”. 

BROWN: And among the board hire businesses dotting the Kuta sand, we find another local worried about the future of his island home. For Jering, Kuta has become a model for how not to develop Bali.

JERINX ASTINA: “I remember the time, I live like probably two hundred metres away from Kuta Beach and at night I can clearly hear the sound of the waves from my room. Now you can hear people say f---- off!”

BROWN: Jering is a Kuta boy born and bred and he sees the commercialism and sheer scale of development in Kuta as a creeping cancer, now destroying other parts of the island.

JERINX ASTINA: “What I see the mainstream, the Kuta or Bali mainstream, the mentality, is selling, selling, selling and so I found a point where dude I have a right to say no to this because that’s wrong and I want to fight this”.

BROWN: Jering is one of Indonesia’s biggest rock stars. His band, Superman is Dead, is a huge national act. He’s also out the front of another push – a growing local resistance to development and tourism at any cost.

JERINX ASTINA: “There’s a lot of people I know that are really religious and going to temples a lot, but they’re just selling out. You know they’re selling out the land and is that a true Balinese, you know? Are you protecting your island?”

BROWN: It may seem odd that a young bloke who makes a living out of a raucous good time is taking a stand against the Kuta-isation of Bali but then throughout the island it’s the younger generation that’s speaking up.

JERINX ASTINA: “It’s what you do, it’s not what you wear. It’s what you do, it’s what you’re saying, it’s what your messages are about. If it’s for Bali, if it’s for your community, if it’s to protect, I mean like if it’s for a greater cause for everyone else in Bali then you are a Balinese you know?”

BROWN: Demonstrations and protests are not a normal part of Bali’s culture – they’re spiritual people not activists – but Jering’s been working to change that alongside his friend Gendo – one of Bali’s best known environmentalists.

GENDO SUARDANA: “What made us angry is knowing that Bali is being destroyed systematically. Balinese people are like lemmings – the lemming syndrome. Lemming – an animal that consciously knows when he gets near the ocean he’s killing himself, but he keeps on doing it”.

BROWN: Across the Bukit Peninsular from Kuta’s nightspots lies Nusa Dua, a quieter, family destination now dominated by huge international resorts.
Here Gendo is tracking the construction of yet another super-sized development – the 740 room Mulia Hotel. He’s the biggest thorn in the side of the government and developers. His activities have even landed him in gaol but he remains determined to reign in the industry.

GENDO SUARDANA: “I am furious and I reject these kinds of projects. Bali must reject big projects like this. Bali doesn’t need any more big hotels – it needs to preserve its culture by doing simple tourism. Something like this is unnecessary”. 

BROWN: In the late 1970’s Bali had just one five star hotel – now there are forty-one. Gendo says they’re guilty of a dreadful waste of water with each guest flushing away three times the amount used by the average Balinese family and it’s a luxury Bali can ill afford as much of the water in this dry part of the island is piped in from agricultural areas further north.

GENDO SUARDANA: “The sources of agrarian culture are land and water – key resources. If these are gone there’ll be cultural degradation. It’s automatic that the culture will change without them. What does it mean tens of years into the future? Bali might become a distant memory. I don’t know why Bali is consciously destroying itself and heading towards the valley of destruction”.

BROWN: Not far from the construction zone Nusa Dua’s main temple is perched on a cliff. There’s a rule designed to keep big developments a respectful distance from such hallowed ground but Gendo says big money and jobs have local leaders turning a blind eye.

GENDO SUARDANA: “As a Balinese I am very concerned when it comes to imagining the future for Bali – especially for those of us who believe in reincarnation. We’re the ones who’ll suffer the destructions we created in this life. The cultural fortress of Bali – in my opinion and according to my beliefs – is the land”. 

BROWN: A few hour’s drive from the hustle and bustle of southern Bali, up into the rolling, rising slopes of the island you’ll find its cultural heart – Ubud.
Ubud has become a favoured destination for travellers seeking a peaceful, quiet and more authentic Bali.
Gendo was born and raised here among the farms and rice terraces where Bali’s brand of Hinduism even shaped agricultural practice.
Subak irrigation is as complex as it is deeply spiritual, binding farmers, water and rice to the Gods who in turn keep the fields fertile and green.

But farmers have been selling their land to developers fuelling a real estate boom that’s driven prices through the roof. Thousands of acres of Bali’s rice fields have been turned over to villas and hotels.

GENDO SUARDANA: “Agricultural lands in Ubud are running out because of the villas and hotels. The saddest part is that right now Subak Temple does not have rice fields around it anymore because the fields are now hotels, restaurants and accommodation.

Right now, Ubud is slowly turning itself into Kuta”. 

PRINCESS ARRY NOVA DEWI PUTRA: “As people from Ubud we just don’t want Ubud to turn into Kuta”.

BROWN: Arry Nova Dewi Putra is a member of one of Bali’s ceremonial royal families. She’s watched her Ubud change from farming community to tourist hot-spot in a relatively short space of time.

PRINCESS ARRY NOVA DEWI PUTRA: “When I was a child I used to go to the rivers with my great grandmother. We’d take a bath there you know, like together with everybody in the village and it was nice and then I don’t experience that for my kids now because the quality of the water, the river is no longer safe for them doing that kind of activity, playing in the rivers. It is a shame you know because I can see now that my kids cannot do that”.

BROWN: Still, Nova for one is hopeful that time honoured traditions will provide the strength to endure. She believes Ubud’s reputation as a cultural centre holds the key to its salvation, that the nightly performances of gamelan and dance have built a reservoir of cultural heritage which will sustain Ubud and preserve its magic.

“It’s not just a tourist cliché?”

PRINCESS ARRY NOVA DEWI PUTRA: “No it’s not just for tourists. You know it’s actually for all of us to inherit all this value, you know who can really, you know.... we know our own tradition”.

MADE PASTIKA: “Balinese people believe that everything in Bali has their own soul. This life is offering. Everything we do in our life is offering to God, to other human being and also to the environment”.

BROWN: In a temple in the capital Denpasar is a man who should have the power and authority to guide Bali’s future. Made Pastika is familiar to many Australians, after all he was the Police Chief who helped bring the Bali bombers to justice. Now he’s Bali’s governor.

MADE PASTIKA: “Tourists is not destroying Bali, the greedy investors are destroying Bali. Tourists is okay. They are good people..... but the greedy investors – that’s the problem”.

BROWN: “Isn’t part of the problem that greedy investors are all mixed up in the political system of Bali and of Indonesia?”

MADE PASTIKA: “Yes of course there is an influence of that but still the people on the right side are still strong and we hope this becomes more and more strong”.

BROWN: Made Pastika knows he’s up against some powerful forces, exploitative foreign investors and a who’s who of local influence. This luxury hotel is part owned by Tommy Suharto, son of Indonesia’s late dictator. This one belongs to the Bakrie Group whose favoured son runs one of the nation’s biggest political parties. A few years ago Governor Pastika issued a decree banning new hotels from this part of the island but developers and local mayors have taken little notice and the cranes keep on coming.

MADE PASTIKA: “You know everybody want to invest in Bali. On one side maybe that is good, creating jobs, moving the economy – but on the other side because some of this investor are greedy, exploitation of the environment, exploitation of the land, exploitation of the people, exploitation of the culture – that is the problem. Those who really love Bali, they will invest with their heart”.

BROWN: Jering has invested plenty of heart in his own business, turning his family’s old bed and breakfast into a rockabilly punk venue. “Twice Bar” as it’s known is popular with local kids unwelcome in the tourist traps on main street, where foreigners walk in for free but Balinese must pay for entry.

JERINX ASTINA: “It takes a lot of our dignity and pride and somehow we feel like this is not our home you know? This is another country. 
What I love the most about Twice Bar is first anyone can just go in there. It’s a symbol of resistance. You know locals have the right to have fun in Bali. That’s what I’m trying to say, my sermon like – tourists is not God here you know?”

BROWN: Jering’s loyal followers – the punks and rockers – are not the archetypal Balinese featured on postcards and travel brochures.

JERINX ASTINA: “You know we’re adopting like western culture but it doesn’t mean we have to be the slave of western civilisation right? What I believe is you know you can look like, not like a Balinese, you can talk not like a Balinese but what you do and what you care about is for the island and for the community”.

BROWN: It’s the young locals, who know more about the world than their parents ever did, who also know they need to fight for their unique home and future.

MEGA SEMADHI: “Surfing has changed my way of life. Surfing took me abroad so I know what life is like in other countries. When I come back to Indonesia it gets me thinking. I need to hold onto this and appreciate what I have more”.


BROWN: [preparing surfboard] “Get some waves?”

It is home to some of the best surf in the world. It’s also home to Mega Semadhi who knows better than most – certainly way better than me – how to ride the waves of Uluwatu, Bali.

MEGA SEMADHI: “It’s like dancing to the moon, yeah”.

BROWN: Mega is a home grown champion, one of Bali’s top pro surfers. He’s living the dream.

MEGA SEMADHI: “Surfing has taken me to other countries, like Hawaii and Australia. If I didn’t go surfing… this is difficult…perhaps I’d be a fisherman or a farmer just like my grandfather”.

BROWN: His grandfather, even his father, knew a very different Uluwatu. A sleepy, off the beaten track corner of Bali, before the crowds and the surf tourists came and over time dramatically reshaped the place.

MEGA SEMADHI: “We go surfing to enjoy ourselves but if it’s too crowded it’s difficult. We rush and compete for the waves. And in the end we’re fighting. It’s not fun. It’s unpleasant”.

BROWN: Over the last 40 years, millions of surfers have come here chasing their own slice of paradise but the influx of visitors is not being well managed and now it’s threatening the very things that make Bali beautiful.

In the 1970’s, many of the first generation of surfers took a winding dirt road south from the main centre Denpasar to find this rugged and remote coast. Its reliable breaks and crystal clean water quickly became the stuff of legend. I first came here fresh out of school but returning today it’s obvious Uluwatu’s popularity has come at a cost the locals can no longer ignore.

MIKE O’LEARY: “When we come here in 1979 there was absolutely no pollution at all”.

BROWN: Australian Mike O’Leary is a local well and truly. He found his first pilgrimage to Uluwatu simply enchanting and he decided to make Bali his home.

MIKE O’LEARY: “Bali was known for its gentle spiritualism. Back in those days you could actually feel, well... ghosts or spirits. You could feel that in the air back in the 70’s and the 80’s. I think it’s probably one of the top six best known surf breaks in the world and it’s a must see on every surfer’s tour of the world”.

BROWN: All that attention has had a dramatic impact and Mike O’Leary’s worried it’s just too much for this place to bear.

MIKE O’LEARY: “Between ten and fifteen thousand people a month are hitting here”.

BROWN: Out of sight of the cafes and surf shops that have sprung up over time, ample evidence of a little backwater bursting under the strain.

MIKE O’LEARY: “Yeah just come in here Matt. This is where there’s a bit of a cess pool here that the surfers don’t see. Everyone sees a great environment of Uluwatu out in the surf but they don’t see the accumulation of the cooking oil, sewerage and other liquid waste”.

BROWN: “It stinks doesn’t it?”

MIKE O’LEARY: “Yeah it stinks, it stinks and I think it’s been going for the last thirty years and I think it keeps seeping out”.

BROWN: Mike and a bunch of other surfers have raised money to test the waters and found human effluent is seeping down to the surf. While they’ve already set up a garbage service they’re still struggling to fund a new sewerage system. In many ways Uluwatu is a microcosm of Bali’s mounting problems.

MIKE O’LEARY: “Bali like the rest of the world has become very serious and money orientated”.

BROWN: Alarm bells have been ringing for decades but Bali is now being stretched to breaking point. Since the late 1970’s the population’s grown from around two and a half million, up towards the four million mark and the number of tourists has exploded from a hundred and twenty thousand a year to well over two and a half million – including eight hundred thousand Australians. Together they generate thousands of tons of rubbish each day and the waste problem is quite simply out of control.

As the tourists pour in, the rubbish is piling up and spilling over and it’s turning these environmentally sensitive mangroves into a putrid swamp that stinks to high heaven. This is just a few kilometres away from the Kuta tourist trap but it’s light years away from tropical paradise.

The rubbish floats down the rivers and out into the sea, piling up on the world famous Kuta Beach. Kuta is the epicentre of Bali’s transformation. It’s radical, ceaseless redevelopment has sparked intense debate about what it now means to be Balinese.

MEGA SEMADHI: “If every place becomes like Kuta, with high rise buildings everywhere maybe then Bali will not be like Bali anymore. If that happens I’ll be very concerned. It would be like… we’ve lost our souls”. 

BROWN: And among the board hire businesses dotting the Kuta sand, we find another local worried about the future of his island home. For Jering, Kuta has become a model for how not to develop Bali.

JERINX ASTINA: “I remember the time, I live like probably two hundred metres away from Kuta Beach and at night I can clearly hear the sound of the waves from my room. Now you can hear people say f---- off!”

BROWN: Jering is a Kuta boy born and bred and he sees the commercialism and sheer scale of development in Kuta as a creeping cancer, now destroying other parts of the island.

JERINX ASTINA: “What I see the mainstream, the Kuta or Bali mainstream, the mentality, is selling, selling, selling and so I found a point where dude I have a right to say no to this because that’s wrong and I want to fight this”.

BROWN: Jering is one of Indonesia’s biggest rock stars. His band, Superman is Dead, is a huge national act. He’s also out the front of another push – a growing local resistance to development and tourism at any cost.

JERINX ASTINA: “There’s a lot of people I know that are really religious and going to temples a lot, but they’re just selling out. You know they’re selling out the land and is that a true Balinese, you know? Are you protecting your island?”

BROWN: It may seem odd that a young bloke who makes a living out of a raucous good time is taking a stand against the Kuta-isation of Bali but then throughout the island it’s the younger generation that’s speaking up.

JERINX ASTINA: “It’s what you do, it’s not what you wear. It’s what you do, it’s what you’re saying, it’s what your messages are about. If it’s for Bali, if it’s for your community, if it’s to protect, I mean like if it’s for a greater cause for everyone else in Bali then you are a Balinese you know?”

BROWN: Demonstrations and protests are not a normal part of Bali’s culture – they’re spiritual people not activists – but Jering’s been working to change that alongside his friend Gendo – one of Bali’s best known environmentalists.

GENDO SUARDANA: “What made us angry is knowing that Bali is being destroyed systematically. Balinese people are like lemmings – the lemming syndrome. Lemming – an animal that consciously knows when he gets near the ocean he’s killing himself, but he keeps on doing it”.

BROWN: Across the Bukit Peninsular from Kuta’s nightspots lies Nusa Dua, a quieter, family destination now dominated by huge international resorts.
Here Gendo is tracking the construction of yet another super-sized development – the 740 room Mulia Hotel. He’s the biggest thorn in the side of the government and developers. His activities have even landed him in gaol but he remains determined to reign in the industry.

GENDO SUARDANA: “I am furious and I reject these kinds of projects. Bali must reject big projects like this. Bali doesn’t need any more big hotels – it needs to preserve its culture by doing simple tourism. Something like this is unnecessary”.

BROWN: In the late 1970’s Bali had just one five star hotel – now there are forty-one. Gendo says they’re guilty of a dreadful waste of water with each guest flushing away three times the amount used by the average Balinese family and it’s a luxury Bali can ill afford as much of the water in this dry part of the island is piped in from agricultural areas further north.

GENDO SUARDANA: “The sources of agrarian culture are land and water – key resources. If these are gone there’ll be cultural degradation. It’s automatic that the culture will change without them. What does it mean tens of years into the future? Bali might become a distant memory. I don’t know why Bali is consciously destroying itself and heading towards the valley of destruction”.

BROWN: Not far from the construction zone Nusa Dua’s main temple is perched on a cliff. There’s a rule designed to keep big developments a respectful distance from such hallowed ground but Gendo says big money and jobs have local leaders turning a blind eye.

GENDO SUARDANA: “As a Balinese I am very concerned when it comes to imagining the future for Bali – especially for those of us who believe in reincarnation. We’re the ones who’ll suffer the destructions we created in this life. The cultural fortress of Bali – in my opinion and according to my beliefs – is the land”.

BROWN: A few hour’s drive from the hustle and bustle of southern Bali, up into the rolling, rising slopes of the island you’ll find its cultural heart – Ubud.
Ubud has become a favoured destination for travellers seeking a peaceful, quiet and more authentic Bali.
Gendo was born and raised here among the farms and rice terraces where Bali’s brand of Hinduism even shaped agricultural practice.
Subak irrigation is as complex as it is deeply spiritual, binding farmers, water and rice to the Gods who in turn keep the fields fertile and green.

But farmers have been selling their land to developers fuelling a real estate boom that’s driven prices through the roof. Thousands of acres of Bali’s rice fields have been turned over to villas and hotels.

GENDO SUARDANA: “Agricultural lands in Ubud are running out because of the villas and hotels. The saddest part is that right now Subak Temple does not have rice fields around it anymore because the fields are now hotels, restaurants and accommodation.

Right now, Ubud is slowly turning itself into Kuta”.

PRINCESS ARRY NOVA DEWI PUTRA: “As people from Ubud we just don’t want Ubud to turn into Kuta”.

BROWN: Arry Nova Dewi Putra is a member of one of Bali’s ceremonial royal families. She’s watched her Ubud change from farming community to tourist hot-spot in a relatively short space of time.

PRINCESS ARRY NOVA DEWI PUTRA: “When I was a child I used to go to the rivers with my great grandmother. We’d take a bath there you know, like together with everybody in the village and it was nice and then I don’t experience that for my kids now because the quality of the water, the river is no longer safe for them doing that kind of activity, playing in the rivers. It is a shame you know because I can see now that my kids cannot do that”.

BROWN: Still, Nova for one is hopeful that time honoured traditions will provide the strength to endure. She believes Ubud’s reputation as a cultural centre holds the key to its salvation, that the nightly performances of gamelan and dance have built a reservoir of cultural heritage which will sustain Ubud and preserve its magic.

“It’s not just a tourist cliché?”

PRINCESS ARRY NOVA DEWI PUTRA: “No it’s not just for tourists. You know it’s actually for all of us to inherit all this value, you know who can really, you know.... we know our own tradition”.

MADE PASTIKA: “Balinese people believe that everything in Bali has their own soul. This life is offering. Everything we do in our life is offering to God, to other human being and also to the environment”.

BROWN: In a temple in the capital Denpasar is a man who should have the power and authority to guide Bali’s future. Made Pastika is familiar to many Australians, after all he was the Police Chief who helped bring the Bali bombers to justice. Now he’s Bali’s governor.

MADE PASTIKA: “Tourists is not destroying Bali, the greedy investors are destroying Bali. Tourists is okay. They are good people..... but the greedy investors – that’s the problem”.

BROWN: “Isn’t part of the problem that greedy investors are all mixed up in the political system of Bali and of Indonesia?”

MADE PASTIKA: “Yes of course there is an influence of that but still the people on the right side are still strong and we hope this becomes more and more strong”.

BROWN: Made Pastika knows he’s up against some powerful forces, exploitative foreign investors and a who’s who of local influence. This luxury hotel is part owned by Tommy Suharto, son of Indonesia’s late dictator. This one belongs to the Bakrie Group whose favoured son runs one of the nation’s biggest political parties. A few years ago Governor Pastika issued a decree banning new hotels from this part of the island but developers and local mayors have taken little notice and the cranes keep on coming.

MADE PASTIKA: “You know everybody want to invest in Bali. On one side maybe that is good, creating jobs, moving the economy – but on the other side because some of this investor are greedy, exploitation of the environment, exploitation of the land, exploitation of the people, exploitation of the culture – that is the problem. Those who really love Bali, they will invest with their heart”.

BROWN: Jering has invested plenty of heart in his own business, turning his family’s old bed and breakfast into a rockabilly punk venue. “Twice Bar” as it’s known is popular with local kids unwelcome in the tourist traps on main street, where foreigners walk in for free but Balinese must pay for entry.

JERINX ASTINA: “It takes a lot of our dignity and pride and somehow we feel like this is not our home you know? This is another country.
What I love the most about Twice Bar is first anyone can just go in there. It’s a symbol of resistance. You know locals have the right to have fun in Bali. That’s what I’m trying to say, my sermon like – tourists is not God here you know?”

BROWN: Jering’s loyal followers – the punks and rockers – are not the archetypal Balinese featured on postcards and travel brochures.

JERINX ASTINA: “You know we’re adopting like western culture but it doesn’t mean we have to be the slave of western civilisation right? What I believe is you know you can look like, not like a Balinese, you can talk not like a Balinese but what you do and what you care about is for the island and for the community”.

BROWN: It’s the young locals, who know more about the world than their parents ever did, who also know they need to fight for their unique home and future.

MEGA SEMADHI: “Surfing has changed my way of life. Surfing took me abroad so I know what life is like in other countries. When I come back to Indonesia it gets me thinking. I need to hold onto this and appreciate what I have more”.
12.40 | 0 komentar

Superman Is Dead Tebar Racun untuk Anak-Anak


Superman Is Dead

SURABAYA | SURYA Online - Superman Is Dead (SID) nyanyi lagu anak? Itulah yang belakangan dilakukan Bobby Kool (gitar dan vokal), Eka Rock (bas), dan Jerinx (drum) di sejumlah panggung yang mereka isi.

Dan lagu andalan mereka adalah Aku Anak Indonesia-nya AT Mahmud, pencipta lagu anak-anak legendaris. “Terus terang kami sudah lama ingin membawakan lagu anak-anak. Bisa dibilang kami cemas melihat anak-anak Indonesia menyanyikan lagu-lagu dengan lirik dewasa. Tidak relevan dengan kehidupan mereka sebagai anak-anak, kok anak kecil menyanyikan lagu tentang selingkuh?” cetus Jerinx saat ditemui sebelum pentas di Surabaya pekan silam.

Lewat lagu tersebut, trio punk rock asal Bali ini ingin memberi kontribusi bagi anak-anak untuk lebih mencintai lagu yang sesuai dengan usia mereka.

Walaupun lagu Aku Anak Indonesia dipilih oleh label rekaman, menurut SID lagu tersebut sangat sesuai dengan karakter mereka. Pasalnya, Aku Anak Indonesia diaransemen dengan musik khas SID.

Personel SID meracik lagu ini dalam tempo cepat lengkap dengan sahut-sahutan vokal ala mars. Sentuhan punk yang diramu lagi dengan tempo mars pada drum menjadikan lagu Aku Anak Indonesia terasa lebih bersemangat dibandingkan versi pertamanya yang pernah dipopulerkan Tasya ketika masih kanak-kanak.

"Pas dikasih lagunya yang versi Tasya, kaget juga, karena ada nuansa orkestranya. Akhirnya, kami aransemen dengan cakupan yang lebih luas, supaya kalau kami manggung, semuanya bisa nyanyi bareng," jelas Bobby.

"Kebetulan ini versinya pas, diaransemen oleh Bobby. Jadinya malah mirip lagu bola," imbuh Jerinx.

SID tak sendiri dalam pengerjaan proyek yang digarap Sony Music ini. Di album kompilasi tersebut juga ada musisi dan penyanyi lain yang semuanya berada di bawah naungan Sony. Mereka membawakan lagu AT Mahmud dengan karakteristik masing-masing.

Seperti misalnya The Changcuters yang menyanyikan lagu Libur Telah Tiba, Numata (Amelia), SHE (Paman Datang), Cokelat (Mendaki Gunung), Judika (Kereta Apiku), /rif (Anak Gembala), Tangga (Pelangi),  Sheila On 7 (Ambilkan Bulan), dan Astrid Sartiasari (Bintang Kejora). Selain itu masih ada Lana Nitibaskara, penyanyi pendatang baru yang juga membawakan Ambilkan Bulan.

Diharapkan hadirnya album kompilasi ini bisa membangkitkan kembali lagu-lagu anak yang selama ini mati suri. Dengan dinyanyikannya lagu anak oleh idola mereka, semoga bisa menimbulkan rasa cinta anak terhadap lagu-lagu yang disegmentasikan untuk mereka.

Lagu ini merupakan ajakan positif untuk berbangga sebagai anak Indonesia dan bersatu di atas keragaman. "Ini adalah 'racun' baik yang ampuh ditiupkan dalam jiwa anak-anak muda saat ini," ujar Eka.

Diluncurkannya lagu anak-anak ini sebagai bentuk kepedulian terhadap tembang anak-anak Indonesia. SID sendiri merasa bangga bisa ikut dalam project ini. "Kami menghimbau kepada semua lapisan masyarakat untuk bersama mempopulerkan kembali lagu anak," ucap Bobby.

Almarhum AT Mahmud adalah ikon dalam dunia musik anak-anak Indonesia. Lebih dari 900 karyanya terbentang dalam khasanah musik Tanah Air dan menjadi lagu-lagu yang pertama kali dikenal anak-anak Indonesia saat mereka mulai dapat bernyanyi.

Menurut AT Mahmud, musik untuk anak-anak seharusnya tidak sekedar menghibur, tetapi juga harus mengandung nilai-nilai cinta terhadap Tuhan, cinta terhadap sesama, dan cinta pada alam. Melalui musik juga, anak-anak diajak berimajinasi dalam dunia yang penuh warna dan ceria.  Aspirasi mulia AT Mahmud inilah yang ingin diteruskan sehingga anak-anak tidak kehilangan jati dirinya dengan memberikan lagu yang sesuai dengan usia mereka.


Taken From : Surya Online
09.58 | 0 komentar

SID For Kids


Tiga jagoan rebel ini akan kembali mengeluarkan amunisi terbarunya. No about sex, drugs or alcohol! Tapi amunisi yang siap mencerdaskan anak bangsa dan akan mengembalikan lagu anak-anak kembali ke koridornya yang benar. Yup, Bobby Kool, Eka Rock and Mr. Jerinx akan menggabungkan bandnya kedalam proyek kompilasi album Ambilkan Bulan/kumpulan ciptaan lagu A. T Mahmud, dimana akan ada 11 penyanyi dan band dari Sony Music Entertainment yang turut pula berkontribusi. Bagaimana bisa sang cadas mau membawakan tembang nostalgia jaman ingusan?

Superman Is Dead

Climagz : Hay, baru aja kemarin Climagz dapet kiriman press release mengenai kompilasi Ambilkan Bulan ciptaan A. T Mahmud. Kok bisa SID terlibat?

Eka : Benernya sih ini permintaan dari pihak label. Menurut mereka band kami punya spirit yang klik dengan salah satu lagu yang dimasukkan didalam album kompilasi.

Kalian langsung mengiyakan?
Bobby : So, pasti. Apalagi proyek ini bukan sekedar proyek musik biasa. Ada misi eksplisit yang dibawa.

Misi apa kalau boleh tau? Dari kalian pribadi.
Eka : Sebenarnya misi kami juga sepaham dengan proyek dari label dan salah satu bank nasional ini. Intinya kami tuh mau menjadi trigger para penyanyi cilik di negri ini agar bangkit lagi dan mau menciptakan lagu sendiri. Kita semua tau lah, ada yang salah dengan sinkronisasi musik sekarang ini dengan anak-anak. Meski kami band punk, kami juga nggak tahan denger anak kecil nyanyiin lagu selingkuh, ckckckck.
Bobby : Sekaligus kita semua mau mengingatkan industri agar mereka kembali melirik pasar musik anak-anak yang sudah bertahun-tahun ini lenyap total. Parah!

Jadi bukan karena desakan label kan? Murni dari SID dong.
Eka : Hahahaha, itu pasti. Kita juga bukan tipe band yang mudah disetir oleh apapun termasuk industri. Tapi kalau ada tawaran yang menurut kami sesuai dan bagus ya kenapa nggak.

Kalau boleh tau lagu apa yang bakal kalian cover nanti?
Eka : Lagu yang judulnya “Aku Anak Indonesia” yang dulu dibawain Tasya. Kita juga sempet agak aneh awalnya disodorin lagu ini. Tapi ternyata spiritnya memang lebih mantap kalau dibawakan sama SID.

Eh, tapi di album Angels and The Outsiders bukannya tema lirik kalian udah condong ke nuansa anak-anak ya?
Eka : Yup, tepatnya di 1st single kita “Kuat Kita Bersinar”. Disitu lirik sama video klipnya jelas-jelas kita tujukan untuk anak Indonesia.
Bobby : Kita udah lama banget pengen mewujudkan misi ini. Kita juga care lo dengan musik anak-anak, hahaha.

Climagz : Apa kalian nggak ngerasa aneh, band punk tapi nge-cover dan aransemen ulang lagu anak-anak, memang segmen album ini untuk siapa?
Bobby : Hahaha, ya nggak lah. Justru inilah spirit pembaruan. Kalau bukan kita siapa lagi. Jadi album kompilasi ini juga ditujukan untuk semua kalangan dan mengingatkan bahwa musik anak-anak tuh pernah jaya dan kita nggak cuma me-reminder aja, kita juga secara nggak langsung memicu pelaku industri dan pemusik agar kembali melakukan kontribusi terhadap musik anak-anak modern ini.

Climagz : Apakah karena Rancid atau Social Distortion, band favorit kalian dulunya pernah melakukan hal serupa sehingga menginspirasi kalian untuk menjayakan kembali musik anak-anak dan charity?
Bobby : Oh, nggak kok. Semua ini pure dari kami sendiri berdasar kepekaan kami aja. Buka karena band atau musisi lain.

Climagz : Ada kesan tersendiri ketika membawakan lagu era anak-anak ini? Atau teringat pada masa kecil kalian?
Eka : Ya, cukup mampu membawa kami ke masa-masa innocent dulu. Di kampung menghitamkan kulit dengan layangan, bersepeda dan lain-lain. Sekarang sih anak kecil udah pada ngutak-atik itu tuh (nunjuk BB).
Bobby : Yup, kalau dulu masih permainan fisik yang jadi primadona. Sekarang udah serba digital. Nggak tau deh pabrik gundu gimana kabarnya, hahaha.

Climagz : Oke, semoga misi kalian benar-benar sukses dan mewabah ke musisi lain. Capek kali dengerin anak TK nyanyiian lagu cinta.
Eka : Yup, sama-sama.
Bobby : Makasih juga atas doanya.
08.00 | 0 komentar

JIPLAK TERUS SAMPAI KAMI MATI!


JRX

Sekali lagi, saya (mewakili Bobby dan Eka) ingin membicarakan masalah ini ke publik. Masalah ini klasik dan lama-kelamaan kami melihat tidak adanya rasa hormat dari sebagian (orang yang mengaku) Outsiders terhadap kreatifitas SID. Tulisan ini kami tujukan kepada KALIAN PARA PENJIPLAK YANG TANPA RASA MALU MEMPERDAGANGKAN KREATIFITAS KAMI HANYA DEMI SECUIL KEUNTUNGAN INSTAN.

Pertama, kami mengaku sangat bangga melihat dalam setiap konser SID ada ratusan bahkan kadang ribuan penonton yang mengenakan atribut (khususnya T-shirt) yang bertema SID. Kami merasa tersanjung dan ada perasaan menyatu dengan penonton. Itu adalah hal yang indah.

Namun dilain sisi, ada hal yang menggangu pikiran kami, yaitu banyaknya beredar T-shirt SID bajakan yang entah dicetak sendiri oleh para Outsiders/Lady Rose atau dibeli dari toko toko tertentu. Yang kami permasalahkan bukan segi bajakan atau tidaknya T-shirt tersebut, namun lebih kepada penjiplakan 100% dari design T-shirt original yang kami produksi sendiri.

SID TIDAK AKAN MEMPERMASALAHKAN JIKA DESAIN-NYA BUKAN HASIL MENJIPLAK 100% DARI DESAIN ORIGINAL MERCHANDISE SID (t-shirt, topi, gantungan kunci dll). SILAKAN JIKA KALIAN INGIN MEMBUAT ATRIBUT OUTSIDERS/LADY ROSE SENDIRI ASAL BUKAN HASIL JIPLAKAN 100% DARI DESAIN-DESAIN KAMI.

Mungkin banyak yang tidak tahu betapa susahnya kami mencari ide yang relevan dengan musik dan misi kami, menuangkannya ke dalam bentuk gambar lalu mengaplikasikannya ke T-shirt, topi dll.
Itu BUKANLAH pekerjaan yang mudah.

Yang coba kami katakan disini adalah, kalian Outsiders/Lady Rose SILAKAN membuat atribut SID sesuka hati kalian namun ingat, buatlah dengan kreasi dan hasil pikir imajinasimu sendiri. Jangan cuma menjiplak design yang sudah kami bikin. Kalian anak-anak cerdas, bukan fanbase bodoh yang tak tahu malu.

Movement ini kami lakukan bukan semata untuk menaikkan penjualan merchandise original kami, namun kami lebih melihat pada sisi edukasinya. Agar kalian tidak terbiasa menjadi tukang jiplak dan agar kalian terbiasa untuk menghargai hasil karya (dalam hal ini design) orang lain.Outisder itu seharus nya cerdas, bukan-nya malah LICIK, TAK TAHU MALU dan TIDAK BERPENDIDIKAN.

Jiwamu tercermin dari apa yang kamu kenakan.

Mulailah menghargai orang lain jika ingin lebih dihargai. Camkan itu!



Jrx
07.30 | 0 komentar

Free Download GoodBye (Cover Air Supply)



Kali ini Havinhell mau bagi-bagi 1 lagu cover Air Supply yang bertitle GoodBye. Lagu ini nantinya bakal ada di album SuperFighter Havinhell... tapi kali ini kami kurangi kualitasnya kawan.. untuk kualitas bagusnya akan ada di album nanti.
selamat mendownload dan sebarkan :)
jangan lupa order merch dan albumnya ya di 085743212182

Download lagunya disini -> Sedot


Taken from : Havinhell Official Website
11.40 | 0 komentar

Konsistensi dan Loyalitas

SID dan OSD_LR Medan

TimeLine Story SID in MEDAN !
Semacam report, agar visitor mendapat informasi apa yang sebenarnya terjadi, semua terangkum dari sumber dan fakta yg jelas terlihat, juga opini dari beberapa orang.
Pelan pelan aja bacanya biar semua kebaca, thx.


Bisa cerita tentang apa yang terjadi di Medan?
SID : Secara ringkas, SID diperlakukan sewenang-wenang di tempat tersebut. SID dipaksa turun dari panggung dengan cara "barbar" seperti dilempari batu, botol Bir, bambu runcing, kayu, air kencing dibungkus plastik, dan segala bentuk kekerasan fisik. Perlu diketahui, si oknum pelaku kekerasan hanya segelintir jika dibanding dengan para pro-SID (baik di Medan maupun Jogja) yang turut bernyanyi sejak awal hingga akhir pertunjukan. Yup, 99% penonton turut bernyanyi selama SID manggung di Medan. Belum lagi jumlah penonton yang amat membludak di kota tsb. Cuman, yang segelintir anti-SID ini bener-bener agresif dalam mengungkapkan ketidaksukaannya. Atmosfir pertunjukan jadi berubah menjadi ladang pembantaian. Sebuah penindasan hak asasi. Kami sampai berpikiran, demokrasi sudah mati di scene Punk Rock Indonesia..

Kenapa sampai sedemikian kasar sikap yang ditunjukkan oleh itu para anti-SID?
SID : Kami tak berani berandai-andai di sini. Tapi dari selebaran yang kami dapatkan di Medan di situ tertulis ajakan untuk memboikot SID. Antara lain kata-katanya: "Menjadi Rock Star adalah pilihan. Menjadi Punk Rock Star adalah pengkhianatan." Kami jadi tersenyum membacanya. Rupanya Punk Rock sekarang sudah banyak peraturan, begitu pikir kami. Buat kami, jika merasa tidak suka dengan SID mah silakan aja.

Go ahead. Monggo. S'il vous plais. Tapi tak perlu dus tak benar secara hukum + melanggar hak asasi manusia sampai menggunakan kekerasan dalam menunjukkan ketidaksukaan. Apalagi sampai menganggap diri mewakili seluruh Punk Rock scene dan membinasakan segala varian lain dari Punk Rock yang berbeda dari Anda. Itu adalah refleksi Unilateralist. Persis George W. Bush. Merasa mewakili Amerika dan merasa berhak memusnahkan para oknum yang berbeda pendapat dengan Amerika versi George W. Bush.

Sementara yang di Jogja, kurang jelas benar apa sebabnya. Bisa jadi latar belakangnya sama dengan yang di Medan. Namun yang paling jelas tersimak dari peristiwa Medan dan Jogja tsb adalah miskinnya pemahaman pada makna demokrasi dan hak asasi manusia serta gejala awal premanisme musikal.

Apa yang membedakan antara insiden di USU Medan dan UPN Jogja?
SID : Di Medan, SID setelah sekitar 6 lagu langsung menyudahi pertunjukan. Situasi sudah sangat tak terkendali. Persis kayak perang aja. Bambu runcing, kayu, botol bir, botol aqua berisikan air kencing, batu-batu besar dan kecil, berserakan di panggung. Suasana juga agak gelap. Amat riskan jika pertunjukan diteruskan. Kami tak berani mengambil resiko.

Di Jogja, setelah dua lagu pertama, terjadi huru-hara, pertunjukan dihentikan sebentar. Lampu kemudian dinyalakan. Terlihat jelas tampang-tampang itu para pemuda yang tak paham demokrasi dan buta tata krama (saat Tinka beraksi--selain terus melempar benda-benda keras ke panggung tanpa henti mereka meneriakkan kata-kata bejat macam "lonte, sundel, ngentot", dsb, kepada Tinka. Malah sampai setelah pertunjukan sekalipun Tinka masih didorong-dorong dan dikata-katai oleh itu para Unilateralist). Kami jadi berpikir, mereka punk rocker atau preman sih? Preman aja masih bisa menghargai wanita, tapi mereka yang saat itu berada persis di depan panggung? Duh, ini sebuah preseden buruk bagi kemaslahatan Punk Rock... (Catatan: peristiwa sejenis pula terjadi saat SID manggung di Surabaya. Sarah, satu-satunya wanita di kontingen SID saat itu, juga diperlakukan amat tidak manusiawi malah ada yang berteriak hendak memperkosa dia oleh segelintir manusia yang mengatasnamakan Punk Rock. Hingga detik ini Sarah tak mau lagi hadir di konser-konser Rock (selain di Bali) karena masih trauma dengan kejadian di Surabaya tsb...).

Nah, lanjut yang tadi, setelah lampu dinyalakan suasana jadi terang benderang. Belajar dari pengalaman di Medan kami melihat keadaan akan lebih bisa dikendalikan jika seluruh lampu dinyalakan sehingga oknum-oknum yang melempar bisa terdeteksi dan jika terjadi situasi kritis kita tinggal ambil aja itu oknum pelaku kekerasan. Memang sih saat SID kembali melanjutkan pertunjukan lemparan-lemparan masih tetap ada namun masih bisa ditanggulangi (he he... lucu juga sih liat Bobby dan Eka sambil nyanyi sambil berkelit sana-sini menghindari batu yang liar beterbangan...).

Apa bisa dibilang para perusuh itu mewakili suara Punk Rock Medan dan Jogja?
SID : Ndak ngerti deh. Yang jelas seperti kita bilang tadi mereka adalah tipikal Unilateralist/Fasis/Nazi/salafi Radikal, telah merasa mewakili kelompoknya lalu seolah diberkahi "license to kill" oleh Tuhan Punk Rock dalam membinasakan orang yang berbeda konsep dengan mereka. Saat di Medan, setelah pertunjukan datang ke penginapan kita sosok macam Roy Romero dari Brontakzine, Army Clown, Cranium dan Underdog. Mereka bilang peristiwa tadi tak mewakili suara Punk Rock Medan. Begitu juga saat di Jogja, setelah pertunjukan datang Burhan ke belakang panggung (konon, Burhan ini adalah salah satu dedengkot Punk Rock Jogja). Burhan menyesalkan peristiwa tersebut dan tegas-tegas bilang bahwa para pelaku bukan dari Punk Rock scene Jogja.

Di penginapan juga kemudian datang Endank Soekamti, Shaggy Dog, dll entah siapa, yang senada dengan Burhan hendak mengklarifikasi bahwa peristiwa di UPN tsb bukan mewakili scene Jogja. Sebenernya buat kita masalah suka gak suka itu adalah hak masing-masing. Namun dalam menerapkannya harus disertai kedewasaan. Sekalian belajar berdemokrasi. Jika orang lain suka sementara kita gak suka jangan lalu menganiaya kemerdekaan pihak yang bersuara beda dengan kita. Contoh sosok demokratis adalah Jimmy "Punk", yang di Jakarta disebut sebagai salah satu "Mbah"-nya Punk di Jakarta. Tanpa harus punya persepsi sama tentang Punk, kita enak aja bergaul satu sama lain. Ya saat SID di Jakarta, ya saat Jimmy di Bali, SID dan Jimmy adalah sahabat dekat. Soal musik? Nanti dulu. Kita satu sama lain gak sepakat, beda pendapat. Tapi secara personal kita adalah sahabat. Hey you Unilateralists, begini ini demokrasi paling sejati.


SID dibilang banci karena gak berani melanjutkan pertunjukan di Medan. Tanggapan Anda?
SID : Dibilang banci, pengecut, dll, ya terserah deh. Coba aja kita tuker posisi, mereka yang berada di atas panggung, dan kita jadi pihak yang melempari mereka. Kalo mereka bisa lewat sampe 6 lagu, acung jempol tinggi-tinggi deh. Saat di Jogja itu, saat kita mundur ke belakang panggung nyusun strategi, para perusuh juga meneriaki SID banci, he he... yang banci sebenernya siapa? Beraninya cuman rame-rame trus pake bawa-bawa batu lagi.

Tuker posisi yuk, kalo gitu. Mereka di atas panggung (tetep rame-rame), SID di bawah panggung ( tetep bertiga aja) sambil bawa batu, botol bir, aqua isi air kencing, dsb. Selama non-stop 30 menit SID ngelemparin mereka. Gimana, seberapa "pahlawan" sih mereka pada?

Berkaca dari kejadian sejenis begini kira-kira apa ada hubungannya dengan masuknya SID ke major label?
SID : Entahlah. Lagipula, apa yang salah dengan major label? Rancid aja masuk major. Bayangin jika Sex Pistols, Ramones dan The Clash gak masuk major, wah, mungkin Indonesia baru tau yang namanya Punk Rock tahun 2000-an ini. Justru gara-gara mereka masuk major (yang notabene pendistribusiannya lebih menggurita ke penjuru dunia) Punk Rock akhirnya bisa dikenal di Indonesia. Dan faktor ke-2 SID bergabung dengan major adalah menjadi sosok realistis. SID pengen sepenuhnya hidup dari bermusik. Di Indonesia, jika ingin sepenuhnya hidup dari musik pilihan paling realistis menurut SID adalah bergabung dengan major. Apalagi SID bukan band tajir. Jika berkiprah terus di jalur Indie karir bermusik kita gak bakalan kemana-mana.

Bakal mentok di situ-situ aja. Itu yang SID alami sendiri bertahun-tahun. Lain persoalannya jika kita masih minta duit ama ortu, main musik cuma untuk euforia sesaat, ya bisa aja kita berkoar-koar tentang seberapa luhur suci etos D.I.Y. (bukan "Do It Yourself" tapi "Do It Your-parents" he he...). Dan dari apa yang sudah SID lihat selama ini, biasanya oknum-oknum yang ngaku paling underground tsb saat beranjak dewasa (baca: harus cari kerja), ortu mereka udah ogah mensubsidi mereka, udah deh, "karir" Punk Rock mereka habis juga di saat yang sama. Hanya sedikit yang mampu bertahan sesuai dengan apa yang digembar-gemborkannya sejak mula. Dan itu pun oh sangat-sangat sedikit yang benar-benar hidupnya bersumber dari musik tok. Mutlak diketahui, SID sudah sepenuhnya lepas dari subsidi ortu, sudah sepenuhnya ingin hidup dari musik, ya kita lalu memilih bergabung dengan major. Bedanya, kita tidak menyodorkan demo ke label manapun (major, minor, indie, major indie, whatever). Jika orang lain melakukannya (ngasih-ngasih demo ke label) silakan aja, itu pilihan berkesenian mereka dan ini negara bebas. Tapi SID tidak. Sebab SID pengen sejak awal posisi satu sama lain, antara SID dan major adalah sejajar.

Sedikit Sejarah tentang Terbentuknya OutSIDer Medan.

OutSIDers Medan



Berawal dari rasa suka yg sama dengan sebuah band yg beraliran PUNK dari Kuta- Bali (Superman Is Dead). Maka terpikir lah (Donny Retrun) seorang teman yg berasal dari kota Bogor  untuk membuat sebuah Fan Base di Medan. (outSIDer) julukan untuk fans dari Superman Is Dead sekarang tapi saat itu nama outSIDer belum ada, dulu hanya bernama Pecinta Superman Is Dead.

Pertemuan Donny Retrun dengan Oky di tahun 2007. Semakin membuat api semangat sehingga terbentuknya outSIDers medan.Terbentuk nya OSD Medan belum begitu sempurna,di karenakan blum ada anggota yg bergabung pada saat itu.

Akan tetapi dengan penuh percaya diri mreka tetap berusaha mengenalkan OSD Medan lewat jejaring sosial. Dan ternyata usaha mreka pun membuahkan hasil, Muncul lah tiga pemuda dari wilayah yg berbeda untuk ikut bergabung, Popsie (Siantar OSD) Berry (Binjai OSD) dan Manulz (Binjai OSD).

Gathering rutin pun mulai dilakukan,dengan membuat logo dan bendera tuk menunjukan keberadaan  OSD Medan . Namun kebersamaan mreka tak berlangsung lama,disaat sang pembentuk fan base (Donny Retrun) menghilang dan tidak di ketahui keberadaan nya, OSD Medan pun fakum beberapa lama.

Hingga thn 2008 hadir seorang teman yg  wilayah nya juga berbeda, Rabel (Serge OSD). Pada saat itu juga sedang mencari keberadaan teman sesama  OSD lewat fan page yg dibuat nya. Lewat sini lah akhir nya  OSD Medan  kembali bangkit. dengan media fb mreka pun saling berkenalan serta berbagi informasi tentang idola nya. Dan tidak lama kemudian menyusul pemuda setempat, Dke Wildan (OSD Medan) yg ingin bendera Osd Medan berkibar kembali.

Kecintaan mereka yg sama terhadap SID membuat OSD yg berbeda wilayah ini menyatu di outSIDers MEDAN. Kekompakan pun terjadi begitu saja seperti layak nya saudara.sejak saat itu lah bertambah nya teman teman OSD yg ikut bergabung. Dengan idelis lama mereka, akhirnya  OSD Medan  mendapat kan tempat Di Bumi pertiwi dan dikenal Superman Is Dead.


(Saya memposting tulisan ini untuk penghargaan saya dengan SID dan outSIDers Medan).
17.39 | 0 komentar

DEVILDICE's National Television Debut: Only Football Can Stop Them!


@DEVILDICE on @RadioShow_tvOne



My favourite local band finally made it to mainstream television by doing a live performance at tvOne’s Radio Show last night (1/5).

Born and bred in the the paradise island of Bali, the boys wowed the audience by kicking the show with a harder take of Godfather theme. The one and a half hour show was filled with their hit songs, with ‘Land of No Angels’ and ‘Palace of My Own Disgrace’ as the starting points where my feelings started to get carried away in its catchy melancholy. Yes, catchy melancholy. An oxymoron which best describes a catchy punk-rock tune with lyrics that mirrored your own personal life, so deep you started to bow your head and sigh. But your sense of humour is strong enough that you do not see the need to cry.

Anyway.

They also covered a ballad by Social Distortion 'Angel's Wings' and the classic ‘Bridge Over Troubled Water’ —in their own signature style, of course. I wonder where I can get a copy of these cover versions… I think they should consider releasing an album especially for it, you know? I always consider a well-built cover version as an art form of its own.

What was planned to be a 13-track show is cut off to 11-track, because a live football match was going to start soon and disrupting it would be as serious as committing religious blasphemy, so yeah. But it was still impressive though. I am not sure which one impressed me more; the performance itself or tvOne’s brave move for adding a non-mainstream punk-rock band to perform on its show. I have never been a fan of the channel but this time I have to say that they had made my dream came true. Kudos for that.

(Thank you, @FakhruoutSIDer, for uploading the video to youtube)




taken from : @animenur -> Tumblir.com
03.08 | 0 komentar

Konser A7X & SID Batal


Selama bertahun-tahun, Jakarta, dengan banyak penggemar A7X yang setia, telah menjadi salah satu kota favorit kami untuk dikunjungi. Demikian juga dengan penyesalan terdalam bahwa kita mengumumkan malam ini (1 Mei) konser di Jakarta, Indonesia telah dibatalkan.

Setelah tiba di tempat tersebut pada pagi dan konsultasi dengan staf produksi lokalditetapkan bahwa tahap di Pantai Carnaval tidak aman dan akan membahayakan band dan ribuan penggemar yang telah membeli tiket. Meskipun pembangunan panggungadalah tanggung jawab promotor, bukan band, kru produksi kami melakukan segala upaya untuk bekerja dengan staf lokal untuk menemukan cara untuk mengatasikekhawatiran dan memakai sebuah acara yang aman. Sayangnya masalah keamananterlalu besar dan tidak memungkinkan bagi kita untuk melakukan.

Anda mungkin membaca laporan dari orang lain bahwa acara itu dibatalkan karenaband ini mengkhawatirkan keamanannya. Jangan percaya. Hanya ada satu alasanacara itu dibatalkan: panggung memiliki cacat banyak dan tidak aman dan fans kami, serta band dan kru, bisa saja terluka.

Kata-kata tidak dapat cukup mengungkapkan betapa kecewa kita karena kehilangankesempatan untuk bermain di Jakarta. Sebagai rincian lebih lanjut dan informasiditentukan kami akan mempostingnya di AvengedSevenfold.com

Promotor Entertainment Ranger dan Showmaxx mengatakan pembatalan konser secara sepihak dari band yang akrab disapa A7X tersebut karena alasan keamanan. Sebab, Jakarta diwarnai dengan aksi demonstrasi peringatan Hari Buruh Dunia.

"As we have a non condusive situation here in Jakarta on the day of the concert, we would like to inform you that regretfully we have to cancel the show, for the sake of band's security and unforeseen circumstances. Thank you very much for your kind understanding and cooperation. Best Regards, Entertainment Ranger," tulisnya dalam akun Twitter @EnRanger.

Meski ini kali ketiga mereka konser di Jakarta, A7X masih mampu memikat fans untuk melihat langsung band yang digawangi M. Shadow (vokal), Arin Ilejay (drummer), Jhony Christ (bassis), Zacky Vengeance (gitaris), Synyster Gates (gitaris).

Sayang mereka harus menelan kekecewaan lantaran batalnya konser yang diumumkan beberapa jam jelang konser. Banyak fans yang mengatakan alasan pembatalan bukanlah karena keamanan namun karena kesalahan komunikasi antara promotor dan manajemen band.

@BIM0ARY0TEJ0: Alasan #A7X Batal : 2) Promotor @EnRanger & @ShowMaxxEnt tidak bisa menyiapkan stage & peralatan sperti dlm kontrak | Poor You!!!
22.51 | 0 komentar
Jika terdapat link free download di blog ini hanya semata review CD Album /hasil karya mereka dan bukan pembajakan.karena saya pribadi tidak memungut biaya kepada siapapun untuk blog ini. Dan untuk teman-teman yang mengunjungi blog ini, support musisi lokal kita dengan cara membeli merchandise, CD/Album original mereka :)


Kalian punya band yang terbentuk dari komunitas outSIDer? dan ingin saya posting di blog ini? kirimkan biografi dan demo lagu (jika ada)kamu ke email fakhruoutsider@gmail.com

Support our local talent!

Cheers!!

Blog Archives

Cari Blog Ini

Statistik

Google+ Followers